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EdData Speaks

Let Education Data share with us useful teaching practices and effective policies.

教育數據與我們分享有用的教學策略及有實效的政策

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DATA SPEAKS - THINGS WE CAN DO TO BUILD BETTER SCHOOLS

Issue 14.MORE PARENTS HELP THEIR CHILDREN WITH THEIR HOMEWORK IN LOW-ACHIEVING SCHOOLS? By and large, schools in Hong Kong varied in the level of parental academic involvement (help with homework and discuss school performance) in Primary 3, Primary 6 and Secondary 3 across Chinese, English, and Mathematics. However, the level of parental academic involvement did not vary with school academic achievement. There were schools with low academic achievement but high parental academic involvement. There were schools with high academic achievement but low parental academic involvement. It is important for principals to understand the parents of their schools and the learning culture of their students.

Issue 13.CHILDREN FROM HIGH ACHIEVING SCHOOLS CHAT MORE WITH THEIR PARENTS? Schools in Hong Kong have different levels of parental non-academic involvement (chat, dine and discuss school life). Some schools face greater challenges in this area, with less parents chatting, dining and discussing school life with their children. There are also schools with high academic achievement but low parental non-academic involvement. It is important for principals to understand the learning culture and parental involvement of their students in their schools.

Issue 12.DISCUSSING SCHOOL LIFE WITH CHILDREN WILL IMPROVE THEIR ACADEMIC MOTIVATIONWhen parents chatted, dined, and discussed school life in particular with their children more, their children would have a stronger motivation to study and experienced less anxiety. The results held true for all educational levels (Primary 3, Primary 6 and Secondary 3) and all academic subjects (Chinese, English, Mathematics).

Issue 11.DINING TOGETHER AND SCHOOL LIFE DISCUSSIONS HELP IMPROVE CHILDREN'S STUDIESChildren had better academic performance when parents discussed school life as well as dined more often with them.

Issue 10.PARENTS DO NOT NEED A DEGREE OR HIGH INCOME TO CHAT WITH THEIR CHILDREN. Chatting, dining, discussing school life and academic performance, and helping with homework are mainly parents’ personal choices rather than a reflection of family income, parental education or job status.

Issue 9.WHY DO PARENTS HELP THEIR CHILDREN WITH THEIR HOMEWORK? Evidence suggests that whether parents
helped their children with their homework or discussed their academic performance with them or not was based more on their personal choice and habit rather than the needs of their children. Parents who were more academically involved with their children more did so not because their children had more homework, were academically weaker, received less help from schools/tutorials, or had parents who had higher educational aspirations for them.

Issue 8.HALF OF PRIMARY 3 PARENTS SELDOM HELP CHILDREN WITH THEIR HOMEWORK About 29%-33% of Primary 3 parents
busily helped their children with their homework or discussed academic performance with them every day, but this decreased to 2%-5% in Secondary 3. At the other end, 43%-49% Primary 3 parents helped their children with their homework or discussed academic performance with them once/twice a month or less, and this increased to 62%-68% in Primary 6 and 80%-92% in Secondary 3.

Issue 7.HALF OF PARENTS CHAT WITH THEIR CHILDREN EVERY DAY. WHAT ABOUT YOU? Most (80%-85%) parents dined with
their children every day, but 14%-20% chatted with them less than once a week, and 33%-41% discussed school life with them less than once a week.

Seminar Presentation - Prof. KT Hau on 10-1-2017

Seminar Presentation - Prof. Andrew Martin on 10-1-2017

Issue 6.You can fly on your own wings  Research showed that family income had no effect on high-achieving students, but higher family income did help reduce a student’s chance of having low academic achievement.

Issue 5.Does family income guarantee first in academic achievement? Results from a survey with 30,000 students and parents showed that students, despite coming from families of different income groups, parental educational levels and job statuses, achieved similar academic results.

Issue 4. Breakfast Habits are not affected by family background Results showed that there was no difference in breakfast eating habits among students from families of different income groups, parental educational levels, and job statuses. Students from the lowest-income families had similar days of breakfast as their classmates.

Breakfast issues 2016 11 28「早餐影響成績」是否有其他解釋? 在研究法上,「早餐提升成績」是否與「食雪糕令鯊魚咬死人更多」同樣地犯「相關不等於因果」的推論謬誤?

Powerpoint早餐和兒童健康政策

Issue 3.Who is Eating More Breakfast? Boys or Girls? As children grow older, girls eat less breakfast while boys eat more unhealthy food.

Issue 2. Have Breakfast Rather than Wasting Money on Tutorials Having breakfast is extremely beneficial to students’ academic studies. Its effects on academics can even outweigh those caused by an improvement in study methods, motivation, self-con dence, parents’ educational levels or family income. To reap the biggest bene t from having breakfast, one should eat smart, which means choosing the correct food for breakfast.

Issue 1. Not Having Breakfast is Trendy? Despite research showing the importance of having breakfast, more and more students skip breakfast when they grow older. Students who ate breakfast every day decreased from 76% in Primary 3 to 60% in Primary 6, and further down to 41% in Secondary 3.

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